Everyone wants to be great

It is natural to want to be great in one’s own eyes and in the eyes of others. There may be lots of people who secretly have a grandiose opinion of themselves. This concept is humorously depicted in photos of a kitten that sees itself as a lion when looking into a mirror.

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Isn’t the desire to excel closely related to the desire to be great? Aren’t politicians, athletes, artists, teachers, farmers, lawyers, tool makers, mothers, fathers, and yogis harboring a desire to be recognized as being at the top level of greatness?

According to an article entitled “Grandiose Delusions” by R. Knowles in a 2011 issue of Clinical Psychology Review, over 10% of healthy people experience grandiose thoughts but do not meet full delusional criteria. If healthy people have grandiose thoughts, I suspect that people in a kundalini crisis would comparatively have SUPER-grandiose thoughts.

Enlightenment and union with God are grandiose ideas

Most, if not all, people having a kundalini crisis are at least familiar with spiritual knowledge. They are steeped in ideas of God being inside them, that enlightenment is a possibility for everyone, and that they would be a great person if they were enlightened.

Grandiose thoughts during a kundalini crisis

People in a kundalini crisis have thoughts that are, as if, 1000 times more powerful than normal thoughts, and therefore they can have very powerful grandiose thoughts. And it is not surprising that the mind would steer grandiose thoughts in the direction of familiar spiritual images and concepts.

In the overwhelming experience of a kundalini crisis, one could latch onto yogic explanations for sensations in the areas of brain, spine, and chakras. The sensations and subsequent thoughts would be intense and would seemingly validate kundalini theory related to the chakras and the channels of the Sushumna, Ida, and Pingala that are located along the spine according to kundalini theory.

Grandiose thoughts could contain elements of enlightenment, union with God, or all sorts of yogic achievements. I suspect that these thoughts are delusions, but it will be almost impossible to convince someone that they are delusions if he is in the mania of a kundalini crisis.